Archive for the ‘embedded’ Category

February 27, 2014

Linaro 14.02 release is now available for download!

The three great essentials to achieve anything worth while are: Hard work, Stick-to-itiveness, and Common sense.   ~Thomas A. Edison

As announced at Linaro Connect USA 2013 Linaro GCC has moved to a pattern of quarterly stable releases, with engineering releases in the intervening months.  14.01 was the first stable release. The next release of GCC 4.7 will be the 2014.04 stable release.  There will be no engineering releases of GCC 4.7 in 14.02 or 14.03.

See the detailed highlights of this release to get an overview of what has been accomplished by the Working Groups, Landing Teams and Platform Teams. The release details are linked from the Details column for each released artifact on the release information:

We encourage everybody to use the 14.02 release.

This post includes links to more information and instructions for using the images. The download links for all images and components are available on our downloads page:

USING THE ANDROID-BASED IMAGES

The Android-based images come in three parts: system, userdata and boot. These need to be combined to form a complete Android install. For an explanation of how to do this please see:

If you are interested in getting the source and building these images yourself please see the following pages:

USING THE UBUNTU-BASED IMAGES

The Ubuntu-based images consist of two parts. The first part is a hardware pack, which can be found under the hwpacks directory and contains hardware specific packages (such as the kernel and bootloader). The second part is the rootfs, which is combined with the hardware pack to create a complete image. For more information on how to create an image please see:

USING THE OPEN EMBEDDED-BASED IMAGES

With the Linaro provided downloads and with ARM’s Fast Models virtual platform, you may boot a virtual ARMv8 system and run 64-bit binaries.  For more information please see:

GETTING INVOLVED

More information on Linaro can be found on our websites:

Also subscribe to the important Linaro mailing lists and join our IRC channels to stay on top of Linaro developments:

KNOWN ISSUES WITH THIS RELEASE

For any errata issues, please see:

Bug reports for this release should be filed in Launchpad against the individual packages that are affected. If a suitable package cannot be identified, feel free to assign them to:

UPCOMING LINARO CONNECT EVENTS: LINARO CONNECT Asia (LCA14)

Registration for Linaro Connect Asia 2014 (LCA14), which will be in Macau, China from March 3 – 7, 2014 is now open.  More information on this event can be found at: http://www.linaro.org/connect-lca14

The post Linaro 14.02 release is now available for download! appeared first on Linaro.

Posted in android, arm, big.little, connect, embedded, Engineering cycle, Evaluation builds, kernel, linaro, Linaro Connect, linux, Linux on ARM, Open Source, Opensource, Release, release cycle, Releases, software, Toolchain | No Comments »

January 31, 2014

Linaro 14.01 release is now available for download!

It is not only for what we do that we are held responsible, but also for what we do not do.   ~Moliere

The first release of this year contains several improvements and additions over the last 2013 release. Most significantly, various components have gained support for the Arndale Octa board, which makes big.LITTLE support available to a much wider audience, and Android has now been fully migrated to 4.4.x with no regressions compared to 4.3.

As announced at Linaro Connect USA 2013 Linaro GCC is moving to a pattern of quarterly stable releases, with engineering releases in the intervening months.  This is the first stable release, and contains no known regressions compared to the 2013.12 release. The next release of GCC 4.7 will be the 2014.04 stable release.  There will be no engineering releases of GCC 4.7 in 2013.02 or 2013.03.

See the detailed highlights of this release to get an overview of what has been accomplished by the Working Groups, Landing Teams and Platform Teams. The release details are linked from the Details column for each released artifact on the release information:

http://wiki.linaro.org/Cycles/1401/Release#Release_Information

We encourage everybody to use the 14.01 release.

This post includes links to more information and instructions for using the images. The download links for all images and components are available on our downloads page:

USING THE ANDROID-BASED IMAGES

The Android-based images come in three parts: system, userdata and boot. These need to be combined to form a complete Android install. For an explanation of how to do this please see:

If you are interested in getting the source and building these images yourself please see the following pages:

USING THE UBUNTU-BASED IMAGES

The Ubuntu-based images consist of two parts. The first part is a hardware pack, which can be found under the hwpacks directory and contains hardware specific packages (such as the kernel and bootloader). The second part is the rootfs, which is combined with the hardware pack to create a complete image. For more information on how to create an image please see:

USING THE OPEN EMBEDDED-BASED IMAGES

With the Linaro provided downloads and with ARM’s Fast Models virtual platform, you may boot a virtual ARMv8 system and run 64-bit binaries.  For more information please see:

GETTING INVOLVED

More information on Linaro can be found on our websites:

Also subscribe to the important Linaro mailing lists and join our IRC channels to stay on top of Linaro developments:

KNOWN ISSUES WITH THIS RELEASE

For any errata issues, please see:

  • http://wiki.linaro.org/Cycles/1401/Release#Known_Issues

Bug reports for this release should be filed in Launchpad against the individual packages that are affected. If a suitable package cannot be identified, feel free to assign them to:

UPCOMING LINARO CONNECT EVENTS: LINARO CONNECT Asia (LCA14)

Registration for Linaro Connect Asia 2014 (LCA14), which will be in Macau, China from March 3 – 7, 2014 is now open.  More information on this event can be found at: http://www.linaro.org/connect-lca14

The post Linaro 14.01 release is now available for download! appeared first on Linaro.

Posted in android, arm, big.little, connect, embedded, Engineering cycle, Evaluation builds, kernel, Landing teams, linaro, Linaro Connect, Linux on ARM, Open Source, Opensource, Release, release cycle, Releases, software, Toolchain | No Comments »

January 27, 2014

Linaro Enterprise Group 1st Year update

Linaro Enterprise Group (LEG) was officially announced at Linaro Connect Europe in Copenhagen, November 2012, and founded by fourteen companies and about thirty engineers. The LEG team first focused on identifying the high priority technical areas and building a roadmap. After organizing into sub-teams, LEG has been allocating and completing work based on that roadmap.

LEG engineering work status is now fully documented in the monthly roadmap updates, in the card structure and recently in the newly added dashboard.  The Steering Committee members use the dashboard  to monitor the status of the high priority roadmap cards including a card’s break down into use cases, functional views, and dependencies between multiple departments. These high priority cards are updated on a weekly basis.

The LEG engineering team is now focusing on several technical areas: UEFI, ACPI, OpenJDK, optimizations and workloads.

The UEFI team is cooperating extensively with ARM in reusing the Tianocore EDK II code port and adding new important features for enterprise use cases. These include GRUB and network boot, passing ACPI and SMBIOS tables, runtime services and booting a Linux kernel image as a native EFI application. Over the past year, the team first prototyped using ARMv7-A platforms (ARM Versatile Express and RTSM models, Samsung Arndale, Calxeda’s Highbank and Midway boards) and then began using the ARMv8-A Foundation model, Fast model and now the Fixed Virtual Platform base models. Patches for AArch64 for the SMBIOS, runtime services and EFI stub were submitted to the appropriate maintainers and the related mailing lists at the end of November.

The ACPI team began by porting the native ACPICA support in Linux to the ARM v7 and v8 architectures in parallel, which included a significant effort in enabling the new ACPI hw-reduced profile mode as introduced in ACPI 5.0 specification. At the same time, the team ported and integrated the key validation test suites – ABAT, FWTS, ASLTS, etc. – in LAVA and then created specific ACPI tables for ARM platforms and enabled ARM device drivers with ACPI probing. The team made sure that ACPI probing was added without breaking the pre-existing FDT node probing. All code is available from our LEG integration branch on the Linaro GIT tree. There is also a separate ACPI table git tree, which contains all tables stored in ASL source code under the BSD license. Patches for the hw-reduced support were posted on the Linux kernel mailing list mid-November with more being submitted everyday.

The OpenJDK LEG team collaborated with the Red Hat experts, who had already started the AArch64 porting project, and helped in porting and testing on the Foundation and Fast models and the first APM 64-bit hardware platform. The cooperation now includes continuous alignment with the latest OpenJDK builds, investigations on bug reports, performance optimization as well as the automation in LAVA and daily execution of the test suites for both Java language compliance and performance evaluation. The Hotspot C1 client JIT compiler was released at LCU13 along with a demonstration. The team also previewed the C2 server compiler running Hadoop Terasort.

The LEG optimization engineers ensured that the LAMP stack (PHP, Python, memcached, httpproxy, etc.) runs on the ARM platforms as well as on other architectures. The engineers then optimized the core libraries underneath the LAMP stack itself, (e.g. CRC computation, AES and RSA signing in openSSL, Hugepages) and even enabled VFP/NEON support in the kernel. Those patches have already been merged upstream. The team is also working on adding backtrace support with libunwind to the perf tool for both 32-bit and 64-bit ARM architectures.

The LEG Steering Committee recommended that the Workload team investigate Open Stack first as the most practical test case for virtualization. LEG is cooperating with the core Virtualization team in enabling OpenStack on top of KVM/QEMU and XEN. The initial proof of concept phase was completed before LCU13 when OpenStack was able to provision a virtual machine (VM) on both the Calxeda Midway and APM Mustang platforms with KVM support. Cooperation with Calxeda and Canonical engineers (32-bit platforms) and with APM experts (64-bit platforms) proved to be key for this achievement. The team is now planning the strategy to clean up the patches and build an official solution to support OpenStack on ARM with both KVM and XEN.

 Overall, it has been a really exciting and productive first year with LEG!

Posted in embedded, linaro, Open Source, Opensource, software | No Comments »

January 14, 2014

Linaro 2013 Year End Review

It’s the traditional time of year to look back and reflect on the last 12 months. Linaro’s continued growth has led to more engineering output and new challenges. Looking forward we want to build on the successes, learn from those challenges, and deliver increasing benefit to all our members in 2014.

With growth in membership and resources Linaro has been able to deliver more than in any previous year, and many building blocks for 2014 are already in place.

Let’s quickly summarize some of the achievements:

Membership has grown to two Core members, six Club members and 16 Group members. This has enabled Linaro to grow to 106 employees and 95 assignees – providing a $40M+ engineering organization working on the ARM software ecosystem directed by, and for the benefit of, its members.

Linaro has along the way become one of the most important company contributors to the Linux kernel, and is home to several kernel subsystem maintainers. Linaro also contributes to many other open source projects including GNU, AOSP, OpenEmbedded/Yocto, and OpenJDK.

Important foundation and mobile work has included supporting the deployment of early big.LITTLE products, upstreaming of key Android functionality to mainline, delivery and maintenance of the de-facto ARM Cortex-A toolchain, many ARM focused changes to the Linux kernel, work on Linux and Android graphics and multimedia, and important discussions on the future of the Linux scheduler and ARM power management. We also see increasing member and non-member use of Linaro’s monthly builds of the Linux kernel, OpenEmbedded/Yocto, Ubuntu and Android.

The first Linaro Stable Kernel (LSK) based on the kernel.org Long Term Supported (LTS) kernel series was produced using the Linux 3.10 baseline in October 2013. LSK will be supported by Linaro Developer Technical Support (LDTS) for two years, and a next version is expected to be selected in 2014 in line with the kernel.org LTS and new Android kernel versions. In parallel with ARMv7 consolidation, optimization and builds, Linaro has been working closely with ARM and members on the software ecosystem for ARMv8. Significant work has included toolchain development, QA and delivery, boot architecture work on UEFI and ACPI, as well as the 64-bit kernel and middleware builds. In 2012 our work was all on the ARM models, which are still supported in Linaro deliverables. In 2013 we have been working on the first ARMv8 hardware platform from Linaro member Applied Microsystems. ARMv8 is now a first class citizen in Linaro’s monthly deliverables.

The Linaro Enterprise Group (LEG) completed an amazing first year. Momentum behind the future use of ARM in servers is building rapidly and LEG is becoming a key delivery vehicle for important pieces of open source software infrastructure for the ARM server market. Work has included delivery of boot architecture software, KVM and XEN virtualization, LAMP stack analysis and optimization, an OpenJDK enterprise class implementation working closely with Red Hat, and test builds of major open source software applications including Hadoop and OpenStack. Extensive use of models and early ARMv8 hardware has been critical in readying the software ecosystem for the ARMv8 SoC introductions we expect to see in 2014.

The Linaro Networking Group (LNG) is still in its early stages, but has already delivered initial results including real time patch set support, bigendian legacy code support, and a networking specific configuration for test & validation in LAVA. LNG is also working on the OpenDataPlane initiative to create a platform independent OS interface to the wide variety of proprietary SoC dataplane hardware.

LAVA has continued to evolve to meet the needs of Linaro and our members both in the hardware lab and in the cloud. Increasing deployment and feedback from members has led to significant efforts in product documentation and training. New product features have included multimode support for server and networking configurations, improved user interfaces, and additional test and benchmark support.

Looking Forward

While much of our work is common to ARMv7 and ARMv8 it is clear that the major story of 2014 is going to be the delivery of multiple ARMv8 SoCs into the market targeting multiple segments – mobile, digital home, networking equipment and servers. Much of our work over the last two years will come to fruition as these products roll out with Linux distributions including Android, Ubuntu and Red Hat, incorporating many technical contributions from Linaro and its members.

Making the most of Linaro Membership

As the year comes to an end members ask “how to quantify the ROI from Linaro”? The follow up is often “What do members get that non-members don’t?”

A simple analysis shows that members are realizing an increasing ROI as membership of Linaro grows, and that an ROI of 3-5x or more is being delivered. The answer to the second question lies in the value of driving and contributing to a $40M software engineering organization that is delivering key technology to the ARM ecosystem, without which all member’s engineering costs would be substantially higher. Members get substantial tangible and intangible advantages from membership of Linaro. Nevertheless, how can the ROI be calculated at 3-5x when Linaro upstreams all output to the open source community for everyone to use at no cost?

The apparent paradox can be resolved only by understanding the difference between working within the open source community effectively, and simply using the output. Followers try to do the latter with decidedly mixed results. Products take longer to get to market, and development cost and maintenance cost increases over time. Leaders, including Linaro’s members, realize that to truly extract the maximum value from open source you must be part of the engineering effort that collaboratively creates it.

An ARM SoC vendor can take one of three positions:

  1. Software is not important to our business plan – we just deliver silicon.
  2. Software is important and we will build out our software organization to deliver all required software, taking from open source as needed.
  3. Software is important and business success comes from investing in open source development to reduce costs, enabling further investment in proprietary innovation.

I would argue that the first option is no longer a tenable strategy. Customers demand high quality software, and ARM SoC differentiation and innovation requires excellent software support that meets the needs of the various application ecosystems. 

The second option is to do everything in house. While possible, this is not efficient. As more vendors turn to open source, building software inside the community is increasingly important. Internal duplicated development of common features is hard, if not impossible, to upstream. The result is an increasingly large set of patches and software that must be maintained and supported out of tree through the entire product life cycle. The cost of this approach increases dramatically over time.

The third option is where Linaro fits. It recognizes that non-differentiated software does not create competitive value. Investing in Linaro shares the cost of common software development. The more members Linaro attract, the higher the return to each member. Linaro enables members to spend more of their software budget on delivering their own value-add. Linaro helps everyone raise the open source bar more quickly for the ARM architecture. This commoditization of the core common software and APIs/frameworks enables more resources to be applied to each vendor’s differentiation and innovation, while maintaining critical software compatibility across SoCs.

In summary:

“As standardized middleware and application ecosystems evolve, the ultimate cost of building everything yourself is much higher than sharing the cost of common software development.”

We also believe that because of the range of activities in Linaro, being outside and attempting to be a follower is now at least as expensive as becoming a member of Linaro. It also causes delayed time to market.  

I look forward to 2014 with great optimism, and the entire Linaro team has a strong determination to continue to deliver further value to all our members.

 

Posted in android, arm, embedded, kernel, linaro, Linaro Connect, linux, Linux on ARM, Open Source, Opensource, Release, release cycle, software, Toolchain, tools | No Comments »

December 19, 2013

Linaro 13.12 release is now available for download!

After climbing a great hill, one only finds that there are many more hills to climb.

~Nelson Mandela 

To avoid clashing with the holidays in many parts of the world, this month’s release – the last for 2013 – is a week early, but contains some key Linaro Android and Ubuntu baselines developments.

  •  For Android,  the ARMv8 LSK and Nexus7_2013-AOSP builds have been setup and Android can be now built using llvm-clang toolchain with the related patches submitted to upstream.
  • For Ubuntu, this release includes the Linaro Ubuntu baseline updated to Saucy Salamander (Ubuntu release 13.10) and the initial Ubuntu arm64 rootfs.

See the detailed highlights of this release to get an overview of what has been accomplished by the Working Groups, Landing Teams and Platform Teams. The release details are linked from the Details column for each released artifact on the release information:

http://wiki.linaro.org/Cycles/1312/Release#Release_Information

We encourage everybody to use the 13.12 release.

This post includes links to more information and instructions for using the images. The download links for all images and components are available on our downloads page:

USING THE ANDROID-BASED IMAGES

The Android-based images come in three parts: system, userdata and boot. These need to be combined to form a complete Android install. For an explanation of how to do this please see:

If you are interested in getting the source and building these images yourself please see the following pages:

USING THE UBUNTU-BASED IMAGES

The Ubuntu-based images consist of two parts. The first part is a hardware pack, which can be found under the hwpacks directory and contains hardware specific packages (such as the kernel and bootloader). The second part is the rootfs, which is combined with the hardware pack to create a complete image. For more information on how to create an image please see:

USING THE OPEN EMBEDDED-BASED IMAGES

With the Linaro provided downloads and with ARM’s Fast Models virtual platform, you may boot a virtual ARMv8 system and run 64-bit binaries.  For more information please see:

GETTING INVOLVED

More information on Linaro can be found on our websites:

Also subscribe to the important Linaro mailing lists and join our IRC channels to stay on top of Linaro developments:

KNOWN ISSUES WITH THIS RELEASE

For any errata issues, please see:

Bug reports for this release should be filed in Launchpad against the individual packages that are affected. If a suitable package cannot be identified, feel free to assign them to:

UPCOMING LINARO CONNECT EVENTS: LINARO CONNECT Asia (LCA14)

Registration for Linaro Connect Asia 2014 (LCA14), which will be in Macau, China from March 3 – 7, 2014 is now open.  More information on this event can be found at: http://www.linaro.org/connect-lca14

Posted in android, arm, connect, embedded, kernel, Landing teams, linaro, Linaro Connect, linux, Linux on ARM, Open Source, Opensource, Release, release cycle, Releases, software, ubuntu | No Comments »